13 LITTLE PICTURES

Oct Screenings

Posted in New Titles, News, Screenings by being on September 27, 2010

Maybe She Loves Everyone by Wesley Leon Aroozoo

Four screenings happened in Sep. Three of Sherman’s films: Memories of a Burning Tree, Tickets and When the End of Winter Is Almost Spring (international premiere) were showcased at the Montreal World Film Festival 2010, ranked 5th in the world in terms of audience attendance. White Days by Lei Yuan Bin was also screened as part of the Singapore Film Festival in Melbourne.

In Oct, you can catch the following screenings if you are in Tokyo, Hawaii, Berlin, Mumbai and Jihlava. We are most glad to hear from our audience. So if you happened to have watched any of our films and would like to share your thoughts, please write to us!

1. Memories of a Burning Tree by Sherman Ong and Red Dragonflies by Liao Jiekai will compete for the Best Asian-Middle Eastern Film Award at the 23rd Tokyo International Film Festival.

Memories of a Burning Tree:

10/23 12:00pm Cinemart Roppongi SCREEN1 (Director in attendance)
10/26 16:15 TOHO CINEMAS ROPPONGI HILLS SCREEN2 (Director in attendance)

Red Dragonflies:
10/26 11:00am TOHO CINEMAS ROPPONGI HILLS SCREEN1 (Director and actress in attendance)
10/29 19:50 Cinemart Roppongi SCREEN1 (Director and actress in attendance)

2. Red Dragonflies by Liao Jiekai and Tickets (short film) by Sherman Ong will screen at the 30th Hawaii International Film Festival.

Red Dragonflies
20 Oct 5:30 PM  Dole Cannery A

Tickets
15 Oct 5:30 PM  Dole Cannery E

3. White Days by Lei Yuan Bin will compete for the Green Chilies Awards at the Asian Hot Shots Berlin (20-24th Oct 2010).  (Director in attendance)

One Day In June (short film) by Daniel Hui will screen together with White Days. Mickey and Peep by Wesley Leon Aroozoo will also screen in the Singapore Hot Shots Programme and the Experimental Shorts Programme respectively.

Yuan Bin and Wesley’s attendance at the Asian Hot Shots Berlin is supported by the Singapore Film Commission Travel Assistance Programme.

4. Memories of a Burning Tree by Sherman Ong will compete in the World Cinema section at the 12th Mumbai International Film Festival (21-28 October 2010).

5. Kissing Faces and Maybe She Loves Everyone will both screen at the 1st Doi Saket International Film Festival in Chiangmai from the 23rd-30th October.

6. Flooding in the Time of Drought by Sherman Ong will screen at the Jihlava International Documentary Film Festival, Czech Republic (26-31 Oct 2010).

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Red Dragonflies at 29th Vancouver International Film Festival

Posted in News, Screenings by Daniel Hui on September 13, 2010

Red Dragonflies have been selected to the 29th Vancouver International Film Festival! It will be screened in the Dragons and Tigers section, alongside fellow Singaporean feature, Boo Junfeng’s Sandcastle. Congratulations Jiekai!

This lyrical first film, elusively beautiful and tinged with abstraction, heralds Liao Jiekai as a major new voice in Singaporean indie cinema.

Here are the screening dates and times:

Saturday October 2nd 1.30pm – Pacific Cinematheque

Monday October 4th 6.00pm – Empire Granville 7 Th 5

13 Little Pictures at 6th Singapore Short Film Festival

Posted in New Titles, News, Screenings by Daniel Hui on August 27, 2010

Rumah Sendiri; Daniel Hui with Ni Luh Sri Suyanti 2010

More 13 Little Pictures short film screenings in Singapore! This time, Sherman Ong and I (Daniel Hui) are showcasing our new short films in the 6th Singapore Short Film Festival, curated by the Substation in Singapore. The Substation has traditionally been a home for discovering new works. We are extremely excited to be screening our films here!

Tickets; Sherman Ong 2010

The films we will be screening are Sayang (Daniel Hui), Rumah Sendiri (Daniel Hui with Ni Luh Sri Suyanti) & Tickets (Sherman Ong), the latter two of which are part of the S-Express Singapore, a traveling film program that would tour the regional festival circuit. Do look out for these films in your country!

Here are some information on the films:

Sayang (29 August 4pm):

A personal rumination on love and loss, using the images and sounds of famous movies. Just as, in movies, we see through another’s eyes, hear through another’s ears, this film stands as an experiment to see if we could also speak through another’s mouth.

Rumah Sendiri (5 September 8.15pm):

A Balinese housemaid works in a home that is not her own. She is the invisible class in Singapore, an unseen population for whom the land is merely transitory. In part a reaction to Eric Khoo’s No Day Off (2006), the film is a collaborative effort whose aim is for you to simply look at her—because, after all, choosing what to see and listen to remains the most political act we do every day.

Tickets (5 September 8.15pm):

This film centres on Xiao Jing, a ticket seller in an old cinema in Singapore. Coming from China to study acting in Singapore, her ambition is to break into the Singapore film industry as an actress.

We’ll be seeing you there!

Wesley Leon Aroozoo’s Mickey in Hong Kong & Bangkok

Posted in New Titles, News, Screenings by Daniel Hui on August 26, 2010

Mickey; Wesley Leon Aroozoo 2010

Hello friends! Wesley have informed me that his new short film, Mickey, will be screening at the 6th InDPanda International Short Film Festival in Hong Kong, before going to screen at the World Film Festival Bangkok in November.

The film will be screened on 28 August at 2pm in InDPanda, under the category “Torn Between Love and Lost.” Do look out for it on the schedule!

Here is the synopsis from the schedule:

An experiment about science and love. Mickey is a film that juxtaposes scientific experiments on lab rats to the mechanical complexity of human love.

We will be updating our friends in Bangkok regarding its screening times soon. Stay tuned!

When The End Of Winter Is Almost Spring

Posted in New Titles, Screenings by being on June 3, 2010

Fresh from the oven: When The End Of Winter Is Almost Spring directed by Sherman Ong and lensed by Lei Yuan Bin, a dance film for the Singapore Arts Festival 2010.

Screening details: 1pm, 5 Jun Cathay Cineplex Hall5, Handy Rd

More info: http://objectifs.com.sg/artsfest/dance/index.html

Great coverage behind the scenes: http://natnemsej.blogspot.com/2010/04/3-years-to-mountain.html

The wonderful stills by han

Upcoming April Screenings from 13 Little Pictures

Posted in News, Screenings by being on March 29, 2010

Hot on the heels of our premieres in Hong Kong and Rotterdam, more upcoming screenings of our works will happen in April.

1. Red Dragonflies will be in International Competition at BAFICI (Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Films):
10 Apr / 19:45 h
11 Apr / 19:30 h
12 Apr / 14:45 h

A young artist goes back to Singapore from New York. She returns home, to old friends and familiar places. Not everything fits in. Memories and friendships are like roots but also like mysteries, and like such, they’re inexact, slippery, at times revealing, at times mere detours. Two teenage boys and a girl, all in their school uniforms, walk near a train track around an area of abundant vegetation; their gait is an exploratory one, charged with fears, amazements and new things (yes, there’s echoes of Rob Reiner’s Stand By Me) One of them gets lost. In that loss, and in the memories of a grown woman, there’s a sense of unease, a search, and the chance of meeting with the past and the people from it. A film of derivations with a subtle and singular sensibility, Liao Jiekai’s opera prima leads us to discuss the always hard to accomplish –even to mention– idea of cinema as poetry, which in this case is made of soft connections, juxtapositions, rhymes, and bars, that seem as free as necessary.

2. White Days by Lei Yuan Bin will have its South American premiere at BAFICI (Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Films):

16 Apr / 20:45 h
17 Apr / 11:00 h
18 Apr / 19:15 h

Dreaming of a trip to Taiwan but stuck in a city they can’t seem to leave from, three young people get together to create a friendship net that would save them from their inanimate loneliness. An unsterilized black & white image, with a documentary-like gray realism, provides the setting for a series of conversations and situations that have as much everyday nihilism as religious theories bordering the ridicule. With an overwhelming contemporary spirit, and a lucid pop art cinephilia, Tsai Ming-liang and Richard Linklater come together as explicit and essential references for White Days’ main characters, but also for its director, who combines the theme of young lethargic people engaging in sharp dialog –Linkater’s slackers– with the challenging aesthetics that implies taking a wide shot and creating a universe populated by Tsai’s vanishing point. Lei Yuan Bin’s film debut is one of the most promising of Singaporean cinema, which is quietly positioning itself as one of the more vital exponents of the continuing Asian renewal.

3. In The House Of Straw by Chris Yeo Siew Hua will premiere in Singapore International Film Festival

“A brave, complex, crazy, funny, weird, uncompromising coming-of-age film for the facebook generation.” –  Graiwoot Chulphongsathorn, NETPAC Juror and writer for Bioscope

“Straw is one example of the more exciting things to come from the real New Wave that’s percolating underneath the mainstream.” – Mayo Martin, TODAY. Read his wonderful article here.

The Arts House Theatre on 17th Apr, 4:15pm

4. Memories of a Burning Tree will be in Asian Feature Film Competition at the Singapore International Film Festival

With understated performances from non-professional actors speaking Swahili, the film gives a striking impression of urban African life without pushing violence, poverty or disease.” Ian Mundell, Senses Of Cinema

Sinema Old School on 18th Apr, 2:00pm

5. Two more screenings in Hong Kong too on the 3 April:

RED DRAGONFLIES by Liao Jiekai >> tickets

03 Apr 2010 at 7:15 PM at Hong Kong Space Museum Lecture Hall

MEMORIES OF A BURNING TREE by Sherman Ong >> tickets

03 Apr 2010 at 9:30 PM at UA Langham Place

Though not a 13 LP film, Roulette City by first-time Singapore filmmaker, Thomas Lim, will also screen under the Singapore Panorama section in Singapore International Film Festival. Do check out this debut on
16th Apr, 9:15pm at Sinema Old School.

13 Little Pictures in Hong Kong

Posted in New Titles, News, Screenings, Upcoming Projects by being on March 7, 2010

It was in Hong Kong last year that 13 Little Pictures first presented our first films. This year we returned with two new feature films in official selection in the Hong Kong International Film Festival and a project selected for the highly competitive Hong Kong Asia Financing Film Forum (HAF). So there’ll be quite a contingent of us there.

At the film festival, 13 Little Pictures will be presenting the completed feature-length films: MEMORIES OF A BURNING TREE by Sherman Ong and RED DRAGONFLIES by Liao Jiekai.  This will be the Asian premiere of Sherman’s film and the world premiere for first-time filmmaker, Liao Jiekai. The latter will be competing for the FIPRESCI critics prize.

MEMORIES OF A BURNING TREE is a road movie set in Tanzania and the first Singapore feature film shot on the digital SLR camera. The title of RED DRAGONFLIES is taken from an iconic song by The Little Tigers (小虎隊) and uses the flight of the red dragonfly as a childhood metaphor for the process of growing up and pursuit of dreams.

Their films will screen in the Indie Power section alongside SHE, A CHINESE (winner of Locarno International Film Festival) and MUNDANE HISTORY (winner of International Film Festival of Rotterdam). Another Singapore film, THE BLUE MANSIONS by Glen Goei will be presented in the Global Visions section of the festival.

MEMORIES OF A BURNING TREE by Sherman Ong >> tickets

28 Mar 2010 at 4:00 PM at UA Cityplaza (meet the filmmaker)
03 Apr 2010 at 9:30 PM at UA Langham Place

RED DRAGONFLIES by Liao Jiekai >> tickets

25 Mar 2010 at 7:15 PM at UA Cityplaza (meet the filmmaker, cast and crew)
03 Apr 2010 at 7:15 PM at Hong Kong Space Museum Lecture Hall

THE BLUE  MANSIONS by Glen Goei >> tickets
23 Mar 2010 at 9:30 PM at UA Cityplaza (meet the filmmaker)
26 Mar 2010 at 5:30 PM at UA Times Square

Widely recognised as one of the most important film-financing platforms in Asia, the Hong Kong-Asia Film Financing Forum (HAF) this year selects only 25 Asian filmmakers with upcoming film projects to Hong Kong. One of them is BETOK, a project in development at 13 Little Pictures. A romance between a non-Muslim Chinese man and a Muslim Chinese woman set in Malaysia, BETOK plots the tensions between the different ethnic, religious and political groups that share this nation.

Two other Singapore projects have also been chosen: THE ARRIVAL by Tan Pin Pin and  CHANG AND ENG by Ekachai. Other projects are by Leon Dai (Golden Horse Best Film winner of NO PUEDO VIVIR SIN TI) and Teddy CHEN, director of BODYGUARDS AND ASSASINS.

This will also be my first time attending the Asian Film Awards in Hong Kong, the Oscars of Asia, as one of the jury members. Whereas more people might know of the Golden Horse, that only caters to Chinese language films, the Asian Film Awards covers Korea, Japan and also India and middle east. Let’s walk the red carpet together!

Date: 28 Mar 2010Meet the audience session
Time: 4:00 PM
Code: 28UC3M3
Venue: UA Cityplaza
Date: 03 Apr 2010
Time: 9:30 PM
Code: 03UL4E2
Venue: UA Langham Place

13 Little Pictures in NUS

Posted in News, Screenings by being on February 28, 2010

If you have not seen FLOODING IN THE TIME OF DROUGHT and WHITE DAYS from the 13 Little Pictures, join us this weekend.

Under the programme “Spotlight on NUS Alumni Filmmakers”, the NUS  Centre for the Arts and NUS Office of Alumni Relations will be screening works from two NUS alumni filmmakers Sherman Ong (NUS Alumnus – Law)and Lei Yuan Bin (NUS Alumnus – Sociology).

Date: 13 March 2010
Venue: Auditorium, Shaw Foundation Alumni House (11 Kent Ridge Drive, Singapore 119244 – more specific directions here)
Free admission
Register here: https://www.alum.nus.edu.sg/registration/?reference=13032010
Time: 2-9pm
Programme:
2pm – Screening of Drought
4pm – Screening of Flood
5.45pm – Panel Discussion with filmmakers Sherman Ong and Lei Yuan Bin, moderated by NUS student film critics Daniel Koh and Chris Yeo Siew Hua
7.00pm – Light bites (provided by NUS Office of Alumni Relations)
7.30pm – Screening of White Days

Flooding In The Time Of Drought by Sherman Ong (PG)
Malaysia, Singapore | 2009 | 184 min | Hindi, Indonesian, Italian, Tagalog, Mandarin, German Japanese, Korean, Thai, Malay, Hokkien | English subtitles

What if suddenly the water supply runs dry in Singapore? This fusion of documentary and fiction narrative depicts the lives of foreign migrants as an impending water crisis begins to seep into their lives. With water, or the lack of it, becoming the central motif, this two-part feature length film takes us on a journey across 8 interweaved stories and 10 languages, as the protagonists, consisting of non-professional actors, grapple with this hopefully temporary discomfort, amidst their dalliance with human foibles, and their fantasies of everlasting loves and broken romances. This aberration is a memento mori as the narratives grazed across the vague impressions of the racial tensions lingering past the 1997 riots in Indonesia, World War II, ritual beliefs, and ethnic discrimination in Southeast Asia which has been ingrained over generations and transported along with the migrant communities. Nonetheless, amidst the sporadic ventures into death and violence, sexual relations and sexualities, these are the lines of division that bind us to each other, in one way or another, as people survive through their crises. Also titled Banjir Kemarau.

  • In Competition at the Cinema Digital Seoul Film Festival 2009
  • Official Selection in the International Film Festival Rotterdam 2010

“Decades from now, these movies are going to serve as some of the most authentic cinematic documents of how we actually lived in Singapore in the early 21st century. I’m impressed.” – Ng Yi-Sheng

White Days by Lei Yuan Bin (NC-16)
Singapore | 92 min | English, Mandarin & Hokkien | English Subtitles
White Days involves three characters who are dealing with their own personal crises. The film begins with a young man, whose trip out of the country is abruptly canceled when the friend whom he was supposed to go with dies. He reconnects with his friends back home, including a religious fanatic who has just returned from a pilgrimage to Israel, and a translator who has always wanted to move out of Singapore. Through a series of mordantly funny conversations, these young people gradually realize that what faces them is not the futility of life, but rather the transience and impermanence of it.

  • Competed for Fipresci Critics Award, Hong Kong International Film Festival 2009
  • Official Selection in Singapore International Film Festival 2009, Bangkok World Film Festival 2009, Bueno Aires International Film Festival 2010

An impishly enjoyable debut that is notable for being so relaxed; and this in itself is refreshing.” – Mathias Ortmann (Read the full review)

An experimental feature… that seems like a masterpiece. ” – Stefan Shih

Organised by the NUS Centre for the Arts and the NUS Office of Alumni Relations as part of the NUS Arts Festival. Co-presented by the NUS Office of Alumni Affairs and Asian Film Archive, in conjunction with its 5th Anniversary celebrations. In collaboration with 13 Little Pictures.

The Year With 13 Pictures

Posted in News, Screenings by being on December 30, 2009

When we started 13 Little Pictures, I never thought we will go on to make this many little films and to be able to share them with audience from Hong Kong to Bangkok to India to Amsterdam. We are just a group of filmmakers who meet regularly for screenings and spend hours talking about cinema. Making films is an excuse to hang out with one another and to experiment with our arguments.

It’s been a great start and a great year for 13 Little Pictures. We’ve premiered 3 feature films (Flooding In The Time Of Drought, White Days and In The House Of Straw) in festivals in Hong Kong, Singapore, Seoul, Bangkok, New Delhi. We are glad they are critically received. Along the way, each of them was also selected to compete for top honours, including Asian Digital Cinema (HK), Golden Kinnaree (BKK), Chameloeon (Seoul), Fipresci (HK), Netpac (BKK).

“Decades from now, these movies are going to serve as some of the most authentic cinematic documents of how we actually lived in Singapore in the early 21st century. I’m impressed.” – Ng Yi-Sheng, Poet, Playwright and winner of the Singapore Literature Prize 2008, on Flooding In The Time Of Drought.

“An impishly enjoyable debut!” Mathias Ortmann,  Film critic on White Days.

“A brave, complex, crazy, funny, weird, uncompromising coming-of-age film for the facebook generation.” – Graiwoot Chulphongsathorn, NETPAC Juror and writer for Bioscope, on In The House Of Straw.

“A Singapore New Wave that actually warrants the term because of the innovations made and not just referring to the “next generation.”” Mayo Martin, TODAY Arts critic.

Of the three films, White Days was picked up for a theatrical run for five months at Sinema Old School after playing to a full house audience at the Singapore International Film Festival.

In addition, we’ve completed shoot on 4 other feature films (Memories Of A Burning Tree, Night LightsRed Dragonflies and one more secret feature project), all in post-production now. We are developing 6 new feature films for 2010.

Next month, Sherman will lead the pack with a hat-trick of premieres in Europe. Flooding In The Time Of Drought, Memories Of A Burning Tree and Ticket (short) will preem at the International Film Festival Rotterdam. Flooding In The Time Of Drought will also screen at the Centre Pompidou as part of the Singapore Malaysia Showcase – Singapour, Malaisie Le Cinema!. One Day In June (short) by Daniel Hui (director of Night Lights) will also have its world premiere at Rotterdam.

We hope to share more of our films more frequently and we invite people who wish to screen them to get in touch with us. We already have a film marathon booking on 13 March in NUS. We are looking at doing a showcase in KL next year. Apart from film screenings, we hope to dialogue with our audience by writing more and writing about the cinema we stand for and envision.

Thank you for your belief in our little films and thank you for letting us share them with you.

“In the times of bigness, spectaculars, one hundred million dollar movie productions, I want to speak for the small, invisible acts of human spirit: so subtle, so small, that they die when brought out under the clean lights. I want to celebrate the small forms of cinema: the lyrical form, the poem, the watercolor, etude, sketch, portrait, arabesque, and bagatelle, and little 8mm songs. In the times when everybody wants to succeed and sell, I want to celebrate those who embrace social and daily tailor to pursue the invisible, the personal things that bring no money and no bread and make no contemporary history, art history or any other history. I am for art which we do for each other, as friends. The real history of cinema is invisible history: history of friends getting together, doing the thing they love.” – Jonas Mekas in his Anti-100 Years of Cinema Manifesto


Wee Keong and Sherman presenting Flooding In the Time Of Drought at the Cinema Digital Seoul Film Festival (CinDi).


Sherman with Philip and Cheuk-To at Cindi.


Bangkok World Film Festival – Flooding In The Time Of Drought and White Days.


Vel (actress – White Days), Tulapop, Big (programmer – Bangkok World Film Festival), Sherman (director – Flooding in the time of Drought), Jiekai (editor – White Days and director – Red Dragonflies), Bee Thiam, Yuan Bin (director – White Days, art director – Flooding in the Time of Drought, Director of Photography – Red Dragonflies).


Victor, festival director of Bangkok World Film Festival and Yuan Bin.

The Real New Wave

Posted in News, Screenings by being on October 1, 2009

Just got back from Bangkok International Film Festival with Chris and we were pretty moved at the world premiere. It was our first time watching In The House Of Straw screened in a large theatre too and all the hard work we put in the post-prod just showed. The picture looked brilliant and the sound projection was superb. Our special thanks to the Bangkok International Film Festival team that presented our little film. Here are some comments from critics who like the film:

“I watched Straws earlier today and it got me wondering if we’re witnessing a new kind of aesthetics being forged in Singapore cinema today – a Singapore New Wave that actually warrants the term because of the innovations made and not just referring to the “next generation”….Straws is structurally adventurous, unapologetically discarding the checklist of what a “proper” movie should have (the acting is so wooden it’s practically brittle) and, I suspect, Yeo treats the various elements of his movie the same way one assembles chess pieces in a game….Narrative-driven dramas/comedy/horror/action may still be what’s the favoured approach to filmmaking in Singapore, but Straws is one example of the more exciting things to come from the real New Wave that’s percolating underneath the mainstream.” – Mayo Martin, TODAY. Read his wonderful article here.

“Singaporean filmmaker Chris Yeo Siew Hua’s debut film has a theatrical rather than cinematic quality to it. Experimental and conceptual, this strange drama is so full of metaphor it’s difficult to understand what is real and what is allegorical. .. What House of Straw is really about is individuality and identity, and how Zhi Wen slowly loses his and is absorbed by the other characters by over the course of the film. (4/5)” – Wise Kwai.

In The House of Straw (A++++++++++++++++++) this might be my favorite film of the festival besides 35 Shots.“, “35 Shots of Rum (A++++++++++) Across The River (B) Adrift (A) Altiplano (B) Antichrist (A+) Aurora (A) Breatheless (A+) Call If You Need Me (A) Castro (A+) Dead Snow (B) Dogtooth (A+/A) Here (A+) In The House of Straw (A++++++++++). A brave, complex, crazy, funny, weird, uncompromising coming-of-age film for the facebook generation.” –  Graiwoot Chulphongsathorn, NETPAC Juror and writer for Bioscope.

claire1

We love Claire Denis too! 🙂

Our trip is supported by the Singapore Film Commission.